Hi. I'm Anna and this is my blog.
grandpaahab:

shawnali:

The first time I held a human brain in Anatomy Lab I was completely speechless. I looked at my classmates expecting a similar reaction and they looked back at me confused like…”dude let’s start identifying the structures.” I had to take a step back and let it process…in my hands was someone’s entire life. From start to finish, every memory, every emotion, every bodily control…was right there in my hands. 

The difference between the scientifically affluent and the rest of the world.

grandpaahab:

shawnali:

The first time I held a human brain in Anatomy Lab I was completely speechless. I looked at my classmates expecting a similar reaction and they looked back at me confused like…”dude let’s start identifying the structures.” I had to take a step back and let it process…in my hands was someone’s entire life. From start to finish, every memory, every emotion, every bodily control…was right there in my hands. 

The difference between the scientifically affluent and the rest of the world.

Track: Before Your Very Eyes
Artist: Atoms For Peace
Album: AMOK
Plays: 489

noondaytune:

Before Your Very Eyes - Atoms For Peace.

Atoms for Peace initially began when (Radiohead’s) Thom Yorke took his solo record on tour. It’s hard not to compare this Atoms for Peace record in the grand scale of Radiohead/Thom Yorke projects - but in many ways, it is truly its own beast. Even though there will be plenty of sounds that you’ve heard before in past records, there’s enough diversity here to keep you guessing and interested.

Contributed by @fictionfred

sci-universe:

NGC 7293, better known as the Helix nebula, is the nearest example of a planetary nebula, which is the eventual fate of a star, like our own Sun, as it approaches the end of its life. As it runs out of fuel, the star expels its outer envelope of gas outward to form a nebula like the Helix.
Images: different views of NGC 7293. Credit: ESA, NASA, ESO.

wildcat2030:

Sleep’s memory role discovered
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The mechanism by which a good night’s sleep improves learning and memory has been discovered by scientists. The team in China and the US used advanced microscopy to witness new connections between brain cells - synapses - forming during sleep. Their study, published in the journal Science, showed even intense training could not make up for lost sleep. Experts said it was an elegant and significant study, which uncovered the mechanisms of memory. It is well known that sleep plays an important role in memory and learning. But what actually happens inside the brain has been a source of considerable debate. Researchers at New York University School of Medicine and Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School trained mice in a new skill - walking on top of a rotating rod. They then looked inside the living brain with a microscope to see what happened when the animals were either sleeping or sleep deprived. Their study showed that sleeping mice formed significantly more new connections between neurons - they were learning more. And by disrupting specific phases of sleep, the research group showed deep or slow-wave sleep was necessary for memory formation. During this stage, the brain was “replaying” the activity from earlier in the day. Prof Wen-Biao Gan, from New York University, told the BBC: “Finding out sleep promotes new connections between neurons is new, nobody knew this before. “We thought sleep helped, but it could have been other causes, and we show it really helps to make connections and that in sleep the brain is not quiet, it is replaying what happened during the day and it seems quite important for making the connections.” (via BBC News - Sleep’s memory role discovered)